Sustainable Urbanism

Sustainable Community

 A Unique Solar Powered Community in Canada

Via Inhabitat – July 08 

Drake Landing Solar Community, Drake Landing Alberta Canada, solar thermal community Canada, solar thermal community, solar thermal energy, solar thermal heating, Okotoks solar community, drake1.jpg

The Drake Landing Solar Community is the first solar powered community of North America. Located in the town of Okotoks, Alberta, Canada, the project sets a wonderful example of how every household can lead a sustainable lifestyle. There are 800 solar panels located throughout the community on garage roofs, and they produce 1.5 mega-watts of thermal power during a summer day and supply heat to the district heating system. The whole system meets 90% of the annual heating and hot water needs of the homes.

Drake Landing Solar Community, Drake Landing Alberta Canada, solar thermal community Canada, solar thermal community, solar thermal energy, solar thermal heating, Okotoks solar community, drake2.jpg

The 52-home solar community has installed an array of solar panels on the roofs of their houses and garages.Glycol solution runs through an insulated piping system, or collector loop, that connects the array of solar panels. The solar panels absorb the solar energy during the daytime and heat the glycol solution. The glycol solution travels through the collector loop and reaches an underground heat exchanger within the community’s centralized Energy Center. The heat is then transferred from heat exchanger to the water stored in a short-term storage tank. The glycol solution returns to the solar collector system. The Energy Center has short-term thermal storage tanks and long-thermal storage tanks (Borehole Thermal Energy Storage (BTES) system).

During the warmer months the heated water is transferred to the underground borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) system via a series of pipes. The water heats up the surrounding earth increasing the temperature to 80 degrees C (176 °F). The water returns to the short-term storage tanks to be heated again. The heat is stored underground insulated with sand, high-density R-40 insulation, a waterproof membrane, clay, and other landscaping materials. The stored heat is used to provide heat and hot water to the entire community throughout the winter.

The homes are moderately sized, ranging from 1,492 to 1,664 square feet, and have low energy demands, suitable to work with the system. The homes are located close to one another, which provides a walkable neighborhood, and reduces the lengths that the fluid for the solar heating system needs to travel. Water conservation has been made mandatory in the homes. The homes have been built using locally manufactured materials, and recycled material too has been used in construction. The homes will be certified to Natural Resources Canada’s R-2000 Standard for energy efficiency, and the Built Green™ Alberta program. The precedence set by the Drake Landing Solar Community can serve as an examplefor every community.

+ Drake Landing Solar Community

Via Green Building Elements

Drake Landing Solar Community, Drake Landing Alberta Canada, solar thermal community Canada, solar thermal community, solar thermal energy, solar thermal heating, Okotoks solar community, drake3.jpg

Drake Landing Solar Community, Drake Landing Alberta Canada, solar thermal community Canada, solar thermal community, solar thermal energy, solar thermal heating, Okotoks solar community, drake4.jpg

– Food Systems

Park + Garden, Vancouver BC.  Courtesy of Onni Developments

Park + Garden, Vancouver BC. Courtesy of Onni Developments

A food system is the cycle of farming, processing, transporting, distributing, celebrating, and recovering food waste in the context of larger natural, social, political, and economic driving forces. Sustainable food systems are energy efficient, protect ecosystems, enhance local economic development opportunities and build community. While re-localizing food systems is an important element of sustainability, Agricultural Urbanism considers the full spectrum of opportunities for building healthy food systems. For example, moving goods on a light rail system would be able to meet market demands for exotic items while being more energy efficient. Sustainable food systems are not just about local farming, they are about resiliency of the farm system in the context of the major driving forces such as the energy crisis, peak oil, food security, and development pressure on farm land.

– Rating Systems

green_energy1

The LEED rating system,

In our biased opinion is by far the most stringent green guiding system there is that provides third party accountability, yet could use some upgrades in terms of acoustical requirements and human mapping platforms,

 

The new LEED 2009 is undergoing a mini-revolution with the integration of LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) into LEED credits.  Of further interest is LEED 2009 for neighborhood development with broad-reaching parameters; the draft is open to public comments.  We love the credit on Local Food Production!


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